Saturday, 17 November 2018

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C CAIR-FL In The News

NAACP youth group, Muslims visit civil rights museum

By Collin Breaux, For Panama City News Herald , On 14 August 2018, Read Original

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Members of the Bay County NAACP and CAIR (Council on American-Islamic Relations)-Florida traveled to Montgomery to visit civil rights museums and learn about the pivotal movement. Members of NAACP’s youth council were among those on the trip.

PANAMA CITY — Local youngsters and community activists received a history lesson Friday when they traveled across state lines.

Members of the Bay County NAACP and CAIR (Council on American-Islamic Relations)-Florida traveled to Montgomery to visit civil rights museums and learn about the pivotal movement. Members of NAACP’s youth council were among those on the trip.

“I’m pretty excited. I’ve never been before,” youth council member Davion Dunklin, who’s graduating from Bay High this year, said leading up to the trip. “I want to learn about what happened throughout the 60s to African-Americans.”

Stops on the trip included the King Memorial Baptist Church, the Legacy Museum, and the National Memorial for Peace and Justice, often called the lynching memorial. The group visited the stones that honor the two lynching victims in Bay County.

Bay County NAACP President Dr. Rufus Wood said the trip was designed for the youth council because young people played a large role in the civil rights movements of the 50s and 60s. It’s also important for today’s kids to know African-American history, Wood said.

“They are our future and the struggle continues,” Wood said. “They will be the ones that will lead us and we want them to know our history, because you can’t deal with the future if you don’t know your history. We want them to be able to bring about the social changes that will be needed.”

Trey Griffin, vice president of the NAACP youth council, said it was a learning experience for everyone who went as they got a window into how others lived.

Bay County Islamic Society member Muath Kabuka said the trip was a new experience for him.

“This is an effort to bridge the Muslim-American community’s divide, to reach out to other minority groups,” Kabuka said. “This is an opportunity for us to learn from them and see what we really have in common and move forward to create a society where we’re all accepted and have equal rights.”